West End Blues - Louis Armstrong And His All-Stars - Ambassador Satch (Vinyl, LP)

By the time Oliver wrote "West End Blues," his protege, Louis Armstrong, had moved on from their band to play with other orchestras.

Impatient to explore his own musical ideas, Armstrong formed a studio band that recorded as either the Hot Five or Hot Seven, depending on its size.

Its second opening cadenza has become one of the most influential and hard-to-copy solos in jazz history. Trumpeter Wingy Manone says that one night, after Armstrong played it, the ecstatic audience literally carried him from the bandstand in triumph. Retrieved 28 December Louis Armstrong. Handy Louis Armstrong at the Crescendo, Vol. Discography Jazz Portal. The rest of the recording follows the OKeh to a tee, though Ory and Bigard bring more to the table than Robinson and Strong.

Armstrong kills the high Bb but he only plays three of the descending arpeggios instead of F and he omits the quick little rip up to the high C. He still makes the run up to the Bb but he might have run out of a little gas. A pretty great version. The success of the small band work in New Orleans, as well as some small group records and concert appearances in and led Armstrong to ditch the big band and begin a new small group, the All Stars.

Well, hold your horses, Charlie. And to start, this should be the main event for most readers. Back yet? Okay, good. Here it is: The Grand Reunion. Louis Armstrong. October 20, Did you catch your breath yet? The original makes the listener gasp because it happens so fast and is so damn incredible. Later Armstrong versions are a little slower and a little grander, especially in the high C. In , Armstrong hit it. In and later , Armstrong hits it The effect is dazzling. The scat duet still works, though now, one can hear Armstrong smiling.

But now hold on to your seats. Great stuff. He gets in four descending arpeggios but most tellingly, he glisses up to the high C, which was just a quick jolt of lightening in the midst of a flurry of notes and phrases on the original.

The Louis Armstrong Collection, Vol. Greatest Hits [Tristar]. Satchmo [Video]. Louis Armstrong His Best Recordings West End Blues. Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Dixieland's Greatest Hits [Disc 4]. Majestic Years. Swing Kings. Finest Vintage Jazz, Vol. Hot Trumpets: 25 Great Jazz Trumpets.

Great Original Performances: Selection of New Orleans. This Is Jazz, Vol. Selection of Louis Armstrong. Best of Louie Armstrong [Intersound]. Sony Music Years: Soundtrack for a Century. Louis Armstrong, Vol. Jazz Cats: Late Night Jazz. The success of the small band work in New Orleans, as well as some small group records and concert appearances in and led Armstrong to ditch the big band and begin a new small group, the All Stars.

Well, hold your horses, Charlie. And to start, this should be the main event for most readers. Back yet? Okay, good. Here it is: The Grand Reunion. Louis Armstrong. October 20, Did you catch your breath yet? The original makes the listener gasp because it happens so fast and is so damn incredible. Later Armstrong versions are a little slower and a little grander, especially in the high C. In , Armstrong hit it. In and later , Armstrong hits it The effect is dazzling. The scat duet still works, though now, one can hear Armstrong smiling.

But now hold on to your seats. Great stuff. He gets in four descending arpeggios but most tellingly, he glisses up to the high C, which was just a quick jolt of lightening in the midst of a flurry of notes and phrases on the original. The flurries are gone, but that high C now sticks out a bit more. Nothing will ever replace the original, but this remake is pretty insane.

The Club Hangover was a hot spot for New Orleans jazz, having housed musicians such as Kid Ory and George Lewis during the same period, so some knowledgeable jazz fan must have requested the tune beforehand. But make he does, really hitting it hard. Again, the descending portion seems to have gotten a little slower, but all the notes are there and I can only imagine the thrill of hearing it live. Armstrong plays some new idea in the first chorus but, as always, all roads point to the Bb.

Also, listen carefully to hear Kyle singing along with his solo. He had just joined the band and in his early days, you can often hear him singing as he plays, purely improvising every note from scratch. Armstrong then enters with the high Bb, but for the first time, age has caught up with him a bit. He can now only hold it for two measures seven seconds before holding it for one more five seconds , taking a breath and finishing off the sequence three more seconds.

The note is still stunning but clearly, between and , Armstrong lost a little bit of lung capacity. Fortunately for us, his chops were arguable stronger than ever, as he would demonstrate in the upcoming years. He also demonstrates it immediately after the held Bb, playing the descending arpeggio six times, one more than the original!

So he still was blowing beautifully, following it up with the gliss to the high C. The band was really pushing now, accenting the first beat of every bar and swinging mightily. Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen What A Wonderful World Hello Dolly C'est Si Bon Mack The Knife The Speek Gerry Someday Just Because Hello Dolly Reprise Artist Playlists.

Louis Armstrong Essentials Meet the man who built jazz brick by brick. Louis Armstrong: Next Steps Brisk, melodic early singles and luxurious late-period riffing. Louis Armstrong: Deep Cuts Good humor and virtuosic invention from a master of many styles. Pioneers of Jazz, Vol. Hello, Dolly! Louis Armstrong : C'est si bon - Single Louis Armstrong : La vie en rose - Single When You Smile - EP Live Albums See All.

"West End Blues" is a multi-strain twelve-bar blues composition by Joe "King" Oliver. It is most commonly performed as an instrumental, although it has lyrics added by Clarence Williams.. King Oliver and his Dixie Syncopators made the first recording for Brunswick Records on June 11, Clarence Williams later added lyrics to the instrumental tune.

8 thoughts on “West End Blues - Louis Armstrong And His All-Stars - Ambassador Satch (Vinyl, LP)”

  1. Live recordings from Louis Armstrong and his All-Stars' concert tour of Western Europe in the autumn of Taken from three on-stage sessions, one made at the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, and the others at a theater in Milan.4/5(1).
  2. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of Ambassador Satch on Discogs. Label: CBS - KLP • Format: Vinyl LP, Mono • Country: Australia • Genre: Jazz • Louis Armstrong And His All-Stars - Ambassador Satch (Vinyl) | Discogs.
  3. Live recordings from Louis Armstrong and his All-Stars' concert tour of Western Europe in the autumn of Taken from three on-stage sessions, one made at the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, and the others at a theater in Milan/5().
  4. Apr 15,  · Louis Armstrong and the All Stars Live in Amsterdam or Milan during the European ceilivargeraftplan.quidwiddispinihungsofortwespasiteg.coed on Ambassador Satch December 19 - I never understood how they specified the date but could.
  5. Jan 31,  · 50+ videos Play all Mix - Louis Armstrong And His All-Stars ‎– Ambassador Satch () (Full Album) YouTube Ella Fitzgerald - But Not For Me (Full Album) - Duration: Lounge Sensation.
  6. As Louis Armstrong traversed the globe, bringing jazz to every corner of it, live recordings became the norm. This reissue brings together concert recordings with the All-Stars from Milan and Amsterdam, buffeted with three previously unreleased bonus studio tracks recorded in New York and Hollywood. Both Satchmo and the All-Stars are in top-notch form here, playing .
  7. Aug 06,  · "West End Blues" was a sleepy Southern blues tune written by Joe "King" Oliver until it landed in the hands of trumpeter Louis Armstrong in the late s, at a recording studio in Chicago. As.

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